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Archaeology Reports

Trailoftears
Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Historical data shows impact on Cherokee skull size

Research shows that events from the Trail of Tears to the Civil War led to significant changes in the shape of skulls in the eastern and western bands of the Cherokee people

Howard Carter opens the innermost shrine of King Tutankhamen's tomb near Luxor, Egypt (New York Times 1923). Image: Wikimedia Commons
Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Unwrapping Ancient Egypt

The study and popular perception of Egyptian antiquities focuses too much on the unwrapping of mummies and the use of technologies such as scanning, according to one academic

The Lod floor mosaic, late third C.E., Israel Antiquities Authority. Photo: © Israel Antiquities Authority/Nicky Davidov
Monday, April 14, 2014

Predators and Prey: A Roman Mosaic from Lod, Israel

One of the oldest surviving complete Roman mosaics dating from 1,700 years ago, a spectacular discovery made in Lod in Israel, will go on show at Waddesdon Manor in Buckinghamshire

Image: Liam Hughes (Flickr, used under a CC BY-SA 3.0)
Sunday, April 13, 2014

Naughty money: clippers and coiners in 16th-century England

Four and a half centuries ago, Elizabeth I made the reform of currency one of her government’s top priorities. Invested as queen in 1558, she inherited a coinage which was fraught with problems

Diver swimming above a prehistoric megalithic structure at Atlit-Yam, off the Carmel coast of Israel. Image: Itamar Greenberg
Thursday, April 10, 2014

The real flood: Submerged prehistory

Flinders University archaeologist Dr Jonathan Benjamin calls for more interdisciplinary work on the submerged prehistoric landscapes that lie off our shores

Ceramic coffin lid after an initial cleaning. Photograph: Clara Amit/Israel Antiquities Authority.
Thursday, April 10, 2014

Rare Canaanite coffin found with gold Pharaoh ring

Archaeologists recently discovered a 3,300-year-old coffin of a wealthy Canaanite, containing a gold signet ring bearing the name of the Egyptian Pharaoh Seti I

Image: Andy Leppard (Flickr, used under a CC BY 3.0)/ Biglari Wikimedia, CC BY-SA 3.0
Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Human-Neanderthal interbreeding is more likely scenario

New research has added weight to the argument that Neanderthals interbred with the ancestors of Eurasians, thanks to a genome analysis method

Flint
Wednesday, April 9, 2014

14,000 year old flint tools: Earliest human occupation of Scotland

Archaeologists have uncovered the earliest evidence of the presence of humans in Scotland with an assemblage of over 5,000 flint artefacts

Bellheader
Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Documentary uncovers the forgotten story of Gertrude Bell

Letters from Baghdad tells the dramatic and thought-provoking story of Gertrude Bell, sometimes referred to as the female Lawrence of Arabia



Archaeology Articles

Image: Liam Hughes (Flickr, used under a CC BY-SA 3.0)
Sunday, April 13, 2014

Naughty money: clippers and coiners in 16th-century England

Four and a half centuries ago, Elizabeth I made the reform of currency one of her government’s top priorities. Invested as queen in 1558, she inherited a coinage which was fraught with problems

Bellheader
Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Documentary uncovers the forgotten story of Gertrude Bell

Letters from Baghdad tells the dramatic and thought-provoking story of Gertrude Bell, sometimes referred to as the female Lawrence of Arabia

Engraving showing George Psalmanazar’s imaginary account of a Formosan funeral. Credit: Reproduced by permission of the Master and Fellows of St John's College, Cambridge
Thursday, March 20, 2014

Fantasy adventures of early-modern Walter Mitty go on show

First edition of George Psalmanazar’s fictitious History of Formosa, which fooled London society for years with claims of cannibalism and child sacrifice, goes on show for Cambridge Science Festival

Apoloniaheader
Thursday, March 6, 2014

Apolline Project: new discoveries on the dark side of Vesuvius

A project whose primary ambition is to piece together the story of the ancient territories of Nola and Neapolis lying on the northern slope of the mountain

SMALLPOX
Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Cities of dreams and death

The fate of migrants moving to cities in 17th and 18th century England demonstrates how a single pathogen could dramatically alter the risks associated with migration and migratory patterns today

neanderhomo
Tuesday, March 4, 2014

Modern Human faces Neanderthal across the Danube

In Palaeolithic Europe 40,000 years ago, two different human species met for the first time. This collision of cultures resulted in our survival, while the Neanderthals vanished forever



Archaeology trowels, tools and equipment
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